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FOR DUOPA PATIENTS: CARING FOR YOURSELF

Here are some useful tips to help you with day-to-day living when you use Duopa.

 

As you begin treatment with Duopa, the level of support you need from your carer may change. Communicating effectively with your carer is very important during these times.

  1. Good communication begins with honesty and respect. Let your carer know you appreciate his or her support—this will go a long way.

  2. Ask for help when you need it.

  3. Be clear about what you would like your carer to do.

  4. Keep your carer informed if your support needs change.

Your advanced Parkinson's disease and Duopa treatment will be part of your daily life. There are certain things you can do to help you in your daily routine.

Consider these tips:

  • Arrange money and credit cards so they are more easily accessible when you need them.

  • If you need to go to a store, plan to go when it is less crowded.

  • Some people find massage or meditation helpful to reduce stress and tension. Consult with your doctor to see if these activities might be appropriate for you.

Take an active role in planning your activities. Getting used to your new routine will naturally take time for you and your carer. Be patient and stay positive.

Exercise is an important part of treatment for people with Parkinson's disease. It can include being active, stretching, and practicing good posture. Always check with your doctor before starting an exercise program.

Here are some suggestions about how to incorporate exercise into your daily routine:

  • Set personal activity goals with your doctor to keep on track

  • Ask your healthcare team what kinds of activities could be right for you. Be sure to choose only those that you are safe doing

  • Start with activities you enjoy. Get some fresh air. Stay indoors and stretch, or practice yoga. You and your doctor can decide what to try

  • Choose the time of day when you have the most energy

  • Pace yourself. Know your limit and never overdo it

  • Change up your activities from time to time, and try new activities to avoid boredom

  • Include your carer as part of your exercise routine

  • Try a group activity to stay motivated and develop your support network

Your brain, like the rest of your body, needs a workout too.

These are some activities that may help exercise your brain. Find time to fit some brain exercises into your daily routine.

  • Playing cards.

  • Doing crossword or jigsaw puzzles.

  • Playing math games, like sudoku

  • Reading a book

  • Playing word games, like scrabble

  • Playing Bingo

Keeping a journal may help you be mindful of how you feel from day-to-day, and remind you about what to tell your doctor during your next appointment.

Some things to note in your diary may be:

  • What you did during the day

  • How you felt

  • Medication you have taken

  • Periods of “ON” time and “OFF” time

Important Safety Information

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about the stoma procedure. Before the stoma procedure, tell your healthcare provider if you ever had a surgery or problems with your stomach.

Talk to your healthcare provider about what you need to do to care for your stoma. After the procedure, you and your healthcare provider will need to regularly check the stoma for any signs of infection.

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms of stomach and intestine problems and gastrointestinal procedure-related problems: stomach (abdominal) pain; constipation that does not go away; nausea or vomiting; fever; blood in your stool; or a dark tarry stool.

Do not take DUOPA if you currently take or have recently taken (within 2 weeks) a medication for depression called a non-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take an MAO Inhibitor.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using DUOPA with certain other medicines, including medications for high blood pressure, MAO inhibitors, antipsychotics, metoclopramide, isoniazid, and iron or vitamin supplements, may cause serious side effects. High-protein foods may affect how DUOPA works. Tell your healthcare provider if you change your diet.

DUOPA may cause serious side effects. Talk to your doctor before starting DUOPA and while on DUOPA if you have had or have any of these:

Do not stop using DUOPA or change your dose unless you are told to do so by your healthcare provider. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop withdrawal symptoms such as fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

The most common side effects of DUOPA include: complications of tubing placement procedure, swelling of legs and feet, nausea, high blood pressure (hypertension), depression, and mouth and throat pain.

Please see the full Prescribing Information including Medication Guide for additional information about DUOPA. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions.

Use

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and intestine (gastrointestinal) problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA (gastrointestinal procedure-related problems) may occur. Some of these problems may require surgery and may lead to death.

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about the stoma procedure. Before the stoma procedure, tell your healthcare provider if you ever had a surgery or problems with your stomach.

Talk to your healthcare provider about what you need to do to care for your stoma. After the procedure, you and your healthcare provider will need to regularly check the stoma for any signs of infection.